Halloween Décor, The Green Way

Posted on Oct 23, 2014
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Halloween is just weeks away and it is time to decorate. If you want more than just a pumpkin and some spider webs in your office, what better to add than a few Halloween themed plants?

Alexa's Halloween desk display. Photo: Katelyn Hutchings

Alexa’s Halloween desk display. Photo: Katelyn Hutchings

Good Earth Plants employee and Eco-Warrior Alexa McEntarffer has her black lily on her desk. Check it out. Very creative! What decorations do you have?

If you are one of our Good Earth Plant clients who receive our exceptional plant service, or if you’re maintaining your own plants, when decorating keep the fake cobwebs off your plants. It can harm the plants and be hard to remove. Instead, consider adding one of these spooky plants to your office for Halloween.

Here are some of our favorite plants for the Halloween holiday:

The Black Bat Flower: can you see how it got its name? There aren't too many flowers this dark. Photo: Wikipedia

The Black Bat Flower: can you see how it got its name? Photo: Wikipedia

The Black Bat Flower is one of the rare flowers this color. It is a shade loving plant that grows in Southeast Asia. Its closest relative is the yam.

Isn't this creepy? The Ghost Plant. Photo: Wikipedia

Isn’t this creepy? The Ghost Plant. Photo: Wikipedia

The Ghost Plant is the exact opposite of the Black Bat Plant. Unlike most plants, it is white and does not contain any chlorphyll, which makes most plants green. Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is a parasite that grows on fungi. It is found in Asia, and North and South America, but it is rare everywhere.

Here's looking at you! These are called Dolls Eyes. Photo: Wikipedia

Here’s looking at you! These are called Dolls Eyes. Photo: Wikipedia

These don’t look real, do they? This is called Doll’s-Eyes. The more common name is white baneberry. It is a perennial that grows in the eastern United States. The “eyes” are actually fruit, a white berry that gives the plant its creepy nickname. Here is the real fear factor: the berries and the entire plant are considered poisonous to humans. The berries contain a toxin that sedate the heart muscle, leading to cardiac arrest and death. But the berries are harmless to birds.

The Dracula Orchid comes from an entire genus of orchids. Photo: Wikipedia

The Dracula Orchid comes from an entire genus of orchids. Photo: Wikipedia

Everyone loves our Monkey Faced Orchid photos. How about a new orchid theme for Halloween? This is a Dracula Orchid. It is an entire orchid genus, “Dracula” or “Drac,” a group of 188 different orchid species native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. These orchids got their name because of the blood-red color of several of the species, and because of the strange aspect of the long spurs of the sepals. Wicked!

Share your favorite Halloween plants with us on our Facebook page and show off your spooky, scary good creativity.