Good Earth Plants

Stone As A Biophilic Design Element: Why You Need Stones

Using stone as a biophilic design element
Everybody Must Get Stones Last post, we took a look at wood as a biophilic element. In case you missed it, it’s not too late to check out some interesting pictures & facts on wood as a biophilic element. This week, our focus has turned to stone. As humans, we are innately connected to the natural world around us. Our affinity for nature is even reflected in the built environment, as we seek to bring elements of the natural world into our homes and workplaces. This sentiment is at the heart of biophilic design – a design trend that emphasizes the importance of incorporating elements of nature into the man-made environment, with the goal of enhancing our wellbeing.… Read More

Trees Are a Teen’s BFF

Are you and especially your kids getting enough vitamin N - as in Nature? Good Earth Plant Company San Diego
  It wasn’t all that long ago that my son and daughter, Ted and Allie, were typical high school students, in a typical 21st century high school. But you don’t have to be a parent or a high school student to feel the impact of the recent events in Parkland, Florida and worry about our teenagers. No, this blog isn’t going to turn into a discussion about events in the news. There are plenty of other places to talk about those issues. But what I do want to talk about is what seems like an epidemic of troubled, depressed teenagers. As a parent it upsets me to see so many kids hurting.… Read More

Making Noise About Plants: Can Plants Communicate With Us?

People have been talking to plants for years. Is there now a way for plants to talk to us?
When I first got started working with plants professionally in the late 1970s, talking to your plants to make them grow better was a hot topic. Even Prince Charles said in a 1986 interview that he talked to his plants. “I just come and talk to the plants, really. Very important to talk to them; they respond.” Some people thought it was pretty hippie dippy, but others took it seriously including a lot of scientists, long before the 1970s fad. German researcher Gustav Fechner wrote a book about it in 1848. Electrical signals in plants were discovered over 100 years ago, in 1873, by British scientist John Burdon-Sanderson.… Read More

Always a Winner: San Diego’s Orchids and Onions Awards

The Old Police Headquarters project Good Earth Plants worked on won an Orchid.
I had a great time at the San Diego Architectural Foundation’s “Orchids and Onions” event last week at the Aerospace Museum in Balboa Park. It is hard to believe I haven’t missed this event in 20 years. One of the best things about the event is seeing industry friends and colleagues including Kelly Dixon, Richard Cox, Roger Lewis, Howard Blackson, Patricia Trauth, Glen Schmidt, Roger Lewis, David McCullough, and so many more of you. It was a blast! If you aren’t familiar with it, “Orchids and Onions” is a tongue in cheek fundraising program put on by the San Diego Architectural Foundation to provides interaction with the design community with the goal of educating and raising awareness among San Diegans about our built environment including its architecture, urban planning, landscapes architecture, and more.… Read More

Ellen DeGeneres Proves Living Walls are Hot in Hollywood

The Ellen Show goes green for Season 12 with a living wall.
There is no hotter daytime talk show on TV in 2014 than “The Ellen Show.” Ellen DeGeneres is an Emmy winning, pioneering comedienne. Ellen’s set has gotten a beautiful makeover for Season 12. It seems like Ellen has gotten the message about the benefits of bringing plants into your workplace. Ellen’s new set features multiple large screens, many beautiful potted plants and an impressive living wall. Take a look for yourself. We have discussed here many times the benefits and beauty of having plants in doors, such as improved air quality and overall health, and we are so glad at Good Earth Plants to see that one of America’s favorite celebrities agrees.… Read More

Good Earth Plants has the Prescription for Sick Building Syndrome

It's not rocket science, really: humble plants like this Pothos can improve worker productivity. Photo: Julien Gong Min
Many of us know what it’s like to work in an office in a city like San Diego. According to a study by global architecture firm HOK as reported in The Guardian newspaper, people in cities spend 90 percent of their time in artificial environments. A newly defined phenomenon in these work environments is referred to as Sick Building Syndrome.  The National Safety Council describes Sick Building Syndrome as a situation where individuals experience acute health effects linked to being inside a building. These symptoms include headaches; eye, nose, and throat irritation; a dry cough; dry or itchy skin; dizziness and nausea; difficulty in concentrating; fatigue; and sensitivity to odors.… Read More

A Valentine’s Day Perspective From The Other Side

My first entry into working in a plant and flower world was a flower stand. I was 20 years old. I owned it. I operated it. I knew every square inch of that tiny, windy shack. And just as I would be sweeping away the pine needles and bits of Christmas ribbon, Valentine’s Day would creep up like a big red monster. I started the annual phone calls to growers for roses by the dozen, wholesalers for vases, tiny cards with envelopes, plastic picks, glittery hearts on a stick. You get the picture. Red Roses. Long-stemmed Red Roses. Red Roses with babies breath. … Read More

Urban Heat Island Effect Bigger Than We Thought

Remember when the terms “Global Warming” and “Climate Change” were first mentioned? Now it’s commonplace. I just read how a research meteorologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography is suggesting that big cities in North America and Asia may generate enough heat to warm areas  as far north as Canada and Siberia as much as 1.8 degrees. In general, the heat gathered from the urban heat island effect rises and travels upwards and its energy may change high-altitude currents in the atmosphere that dictate prevailing weather. Meteorologists have known that cities are warmer than rural areas with cars, buildings, asphalt and roofs that absorb heat.… Read More